RING OF HONOR/PCO: Frankenstein-meets-fairytale at age 52 as pro wrestler PCO earns title he long craved (Charlotte Observer)

Posted on 1/11/120 by Mike Informer



Frankenstein-meets-fairytale at age 52 as pro wrestler
PCO earns title he long craved


BY COURTNEY DEVORES CORRESPONDENT
JANUARY 09, 2020 02:34 PM

At the age of 14, Pierre Carl Ouellet told his parents hed
someday win pro wrestlings world championship title.

In December, after 30-plus years in the business, that
promise came true: At 52, PCO (as hes known in the ring)
bested seemingly unbeatable 31-year-old luchador Rush
(pronounced Roosh) to capture Ring of Honors World
Championship.

I defeated a huge Mexican superstar who had like 77
victories, 0 losses, he says. Since then, its been super-
crazy.

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On Monday, he was honored by the NHL during a Montreal
Canadiens game.

The greatest dynasty in sports honored me, showed me on
their big giant screen showing the belt to 21,000 hockey
fans, and let me explain my journey to them in a couple of
minutes, Ouellet says of the hometown-heros welcome.

On Saturday in Atlanta, hell defend the belt for the first
time in a rematch against Rush. The foes meet again Sunday
when Six-Man Tag Team Champions Villain Enterprises (PCO,
Marty Scurl and Brody King) face Rushs La Faccion
Ingobernable during the Honor Reigns Supreme event at
Concords Cabarrus Arena.

PCOs popularity was evident in April, when he and tag
partner King won the resurrected Crockett Cup Tournament in
Concord after eliminating seven other tag teams over the
course of three grueling matches. Fans that knew him chanted
his name from the moment he hit the entrance ramp looking
like a crazed Mad Max villain. Those that werent familiar
with him were equally enthralled by the towering 300-pound
figure who could flip from the top rope.

Ouellet has wrestled for decades. He held the WWF Tag Team
Championship three times in the 90s as one half of the
Quebecers. He wrestled for WCW, TNA, ECW and numerous
independent promotions, but it wasnt until he reinvented
himself as the French-Canadian Frankenstein a character
whose resurrection mirrors that of PCOs career that he
became a breakout star.

A 2018 Wrestlemania weekend match in New Orleans against
Austrian brute Walter (now signed with WWEs NXT) solidified
PCOs reputation with fans. The independent promotion that
hired him couldnt afford to fly him to New Orleans, so he
drove 40 hours for a 25-minute match.

Half the crowd didnt know who I was, and the rest knew who
I was in WWE years ago. They didnt know what to expect from
me, Ouellet says. Walter is known for his chops where you
(slap) the guy in the chest as hard as you can. Hell have
guys bleeding from the chest. I decided I was there to make
a name for myself. When we started exchanging chops, I
didnt give an inch. My chest turned purple, then green,
then black. When I went up for the big aerial move,
everybody in the crowd stood up at once. It was like in the
movie when Rockys fighting in Russia. I beat him at the
count of three and the crowd erupted.

From that match on, Ouellet became the poster boy for
independent wrestling. Everything I dreamed of as a kid
came about after that match, he says.

The climb was long and tough, though. He flipped between
wrestling and hockey throughout his youth, undeterred after
losing sight in one eye while playing cowboys and Indians at
age 12.

We ran out of pellets and started putting sticks in the
cannons instead, he recalls. It went into my eye and being
12 and not knowing, I pulled it out. I kept my eye, but was
blinded.

He played for NHL farm clubs, but wrestling won out. After
working in South Africa, Europe and Puerto Rico, he signed
with the World Wrestling Federation in the early 90s.

Fame, glory and money went straight to my head, he says.
It was after his second run with the WWE in 2001 that he
realized he needed to change.

That was one of my worst years. From there I started to
work on my own habits and values, he says. He became a
successful wrestling commentator, but the ring still called
to him.

I quit a great job, he says. They offered to hold the job
for three months, but I told them to hire someone else.

The comeback never materialized, and in 2011 after the
birth of his daughter London in 2008 he officially retired
from the sport.

But he never really left. He began training in different
styles, incorporating gymnastics into his routine and
perfecting high-flying stunts like the moonsault.

I was always flexible and willing to try things, he says.

He and his Dr. Frankenstein of sorts Destro (aka PCOs
manager/trainer) filmed vignettes for YouTube that featured
acts of strength and PCO being raised from the dead with
jumper cables a la Frankenstein. The monster gimmick hit
home with fans, as did his in-ring antics.

I was not wrestling under my old persona, he says. I
reinvented myself. Getting the world title was the first
step. Im really looking forward to the next chapter.






























































































































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